CDC Reports 611 Cases of Salmonella from Backyard Chickens


The CDC recently has linked 611 cases of Salmonellosis with backyard poultry.  While these cases are not cause for widespread alarm or banning of chickens altogether, they serve as a reminder to practice good hygiene around the birds. Their waste may harbor Salmonella and E. coli, so handwashing is important when you come in from the coop. Exercise common sense in handling your birds, as you would with other animals.

Washing your hands is one of the top ways experts suggest to protect yourself.

After you handle live poultry, feed live poultry, or touch its backyard coop or living space,wash your hands vigorously for 20 seconds or more with soap and water, then dry them with a clean towel. Have an alcohol-based hand sanitizer handy in case you can’t get to a sink right away, says Elizabeth Scott, PhD, co-director of the Center for Hygiene and Health at Simmons College in Boston.

“If possible, wash your hands outdoors, not at the kitchen sink,” Scott says. “You do not want to be rinsing salmonella off your hands and into the kitchen sink, and you don’t want to use the kitchen sponge or dishrag either. The salmonella can proliferate in both.”

You should also clean any feeding dishes or other equipment outside. Do not bring them indoors. (from WebMD)

These are fairly simple measures that you can take to ensure health and enjoy your chickens.

 

 

 

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2 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Joe Ballerine on July 22, 2016 at 12:38 pm

    Thank you for posting this info and I also appreciate your input last night at our Riverside Village meeting. Your input was upfront and honest, anyone considering backyard hens should be required to go to one of your talks.

    Reply

    • Thanks for bringing this information to my attention, Joe. I appreciate your vote of confidence. I feel it is important for people to have a fair, well-rounded view of these birds I enjoy so much! Information and education prevent impulsive decisions. That’s ultimately better for all involved: chickens, owners, neighbors. If you have further questions, don’t hesitate to contact me.

      Reply

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