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208 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Ed Homeier on July 8, 2011 at 7:06 pm

    Thanks for all you are doing.

    One of our residents wants to end the zoning ban currently in existence for fowl raised in Ford County. It’s forbidden within 100 ft of another residence.

    Are you available to give advice on matters like this?

    Reply

  2. Posted by Carroll English on July 8, 2011 at 9:27 pm

    Hello. Last summer I quietly raised two hens in my backyard, which was not in keeping with the Ford Co. ordinance on livestock in a town. Neighbors want me to confront the county zoning board and get them to change the extreme restrictiveness which they are reputed to exercise. Most people in the community enjoyed the “ladies” and supported our having poultry in our tiny village of 100 people. A couple of persons have been identified as opposing them. The zoning board has the reputation for being inflexible on the matter. I’m whomping up my nerve and finding out what may be the issues to contend with in order to enter into the arena here..
    You were recommended as someone who could counsel me/us on this matter. Do you have some items to suggest we do, know, ask, etc.? Thank you very much! Sincerely, Carroll

    Reply

  3. Posted by Nancy Cistaro on July 16, 2011 at 11:10 am

    My son started a flock this spring – the code enforcer came to his door to say there was a complaint and he had 2 weeks to remove the birds . . .I found homes for his 2 banty roosters . . this morning he dropped off a Easter Egger Rooster . . I have one and do not want another (9 hens & 1 rooster) so if anyone wants him please contact me he was supposed to be hatched out April 12 . . my son is going to try to keep the hens he plans on going before the board – he lives in Holland, MI , I am so.sub. chicago

    Reply

  4. Hello! I am a Farmers Market Director and all of our farmers lost their flocks this season. I’d like to offer our community some thoughts on starting their own flocks and wondered if you’d be interested in doing a presentation sometime. Looking forward to your thoughts….Sheree

    Reply

  5. Posted by Ed Homeier on August 26, 2011 at 2:57 pm

    I wanted to give those interested, an update on the Ford County zoning board vs chicken-lovers situation.

    Instead of requesting an individual variance through the Zoning Board and County Board, as is required to lift this restriction, a couple of personal conversation with the zoning officer took place. He was reluctant to act through the zoning process, and finally gave Carroll permission to keep a couple of hens in town PROVIDED she got written permission from her neighbors, and with the understanding that should anyone object the birds would have to go. Carroll seems happy. Between her need to keep and care for birds she feeds a unique diet, and our chicken co-operative (which has been around for a good number of years outside the town limits), all here now seem to have their “fowl needs” satisfied for now.

    Ed Homeier

    Reply

  6. This coming Monday (10/10) is the day the Village of Brookfield will be voting on the backyard hen ordinance. Please come out! Let’s make one big, last push toward this positive change.

    http://brookfieldchickens.blogspot.com/2011/10/monday-1010-is-voting-day.html

    Reply

  7. Posted by Jill Selinger on October 28, 2011 at 11:45 am

    hi, Jen—-

    I would like to offer a class at Chicago Botanic Garden on Raising Backyard Chickens–Martha at Angelic Organics suggested I contact you–

    would that be of interest to you?

    look forward to hearing from you —what a terrific website!!!
    Jill

    Reply

  8. Posted by cindy on November 26, 2011 at 9:26 pm

    Hi. Loved your article on what egg labels mean, but you left off Pastured. Granted it is a small segment of total egg production, and mostly produced by small flock holders, but worth seeking out b/c of the humane treatment of the hens and the superior taste of the eggs. Only thing better is raising your own.

    Reply

  9. Posted by Laura Urbaszewski on December 6, 2011 at 9:07 pm

    Hello,

    I just found your blog. A small rooster showed up in my alley tonight. We let him into the yard. Very pretty, black and white, maybe someone’s former fighting bird? Seems a rooster, has long spurs. Doesn’t look full grown. Anway, we did not know quite what to do with him but wondered if there was anyone to call who would take him besides animal control. Do you know what I should do? I’m a softie, I feel bad for the guy and its cold out. We live in Hermosa.

    Reply

  10. Posted by Kim Wilson on January 7, 2012 at 4:43 pm

    Jennifer,

    Two of my chickens have impacted crops which I can feel as soon as I pick them up. Can you come take a look and tell me what to do? You’ve came by earlier this last spring to clip their wing for me.

    Thanks

    Reply

    • Hi, Kim –
      I’ve responded offline – but for the benefit of folks reading, check in a few hours to see if the crop has gone down or feels looser! You may have simply caught them after a big meal!
      Jen

      Reply

  11. Posted by drlajohn on January 9, 2012 at 12:33 pm

    While I know you are not physically located in the Mid Atlantic Region, I know many individuals from all over use your website. Recently I found out about a great resource for people who have or are considering starting a small flock. Would you be willing to post a comment or put a link on your website to the Mid-Atlantic Small Flock Poultry Expo sponsored by the University of Maryland. It is a whole day of classes taught by various poultry experts that are targeting the backyard flock owner. It sounds like an awesome opportunity for people in the mid-atlantic region. All the information for the event is posted at http://carroll.umd.edu/ag/poultry.cfm
    Thanks
    LeAnn

    Reply

  12. Posted by Marianne Dietz on January 16, 2012 at 8:01 pm

    Hi Jennifer,
    We are trying to get Orland Park to modify their ordinance to allow Backyard Chickens. There is a village-wide green initiative, but the house is divided with allowing chickens. Too many complaints have come to them in the past, angry neighbors, loud, smelly chicken complaints, etc…mainly because the owners were not taking care or had too many. Going before the board is our next step, but we were warned that this past negative history may create a difficult path. Would like to cut through the red tape and plea our desire with passion and compassion for green, environment, healthy organic sustainable living. Any advice you can share would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!

    Reply

  13. Posted by Constance on January 17, 2012 at 12:04 am

    Hello Jen,
    I got your name from Martha Boyd at AOLC. I’m a member of the local foods work group at the Winnebago County office of U of IL Extension (Rockford area). I’d be interested in discussing the possibility of your giving a presentation in this area. Hopefully we could discuss details in a separate email.
    Looking forward to being in touch soon–

    Reply

  14. Good afternoon Jennifer,

    I read your profile in the paper this morning. I’m glad to see you’ve taken to the challenge of educating urban chicken ranchers. I’d like to share with you my own pursuit when you have the time. I hope your story does more to spur the acceptance of chicken coops in suburbia.

    Regards,

    Todd Jones

    Reply

  15. Posted by Danielle on February 19, 2012 at 7:21 pm

    Hello, I was wondering if you have a list of towns/cities in the Chicagoland area that allow backyard hens. Thanks!

    Reply

  16. Posted by Danielle on February 28, 2012 at 6:19 pm

    I just wanted to say thank you for the avian vet referral this morning. I went to see Dr. Sakas and he was amazing!!! Afordable and very knowledgable. I thought she was eggbound, and it turned out she is impacted head to tail with sand!!! She is overeating it for some reason, ovulation suspected. He is keeping her overnight and is going to try fixing her. Fingers crossed!!!

    Thank you.
    Danielle

    Reply

  17. Posted by Susan Lawrence on March 28, 2012 at 6:55 am

    Thank you for a wonderful program, last night! It was fun and interesting and very informative. I’m so glad you are nearby and available, as I begin planning for my first chickens!

    Reply

  18. Hi Jennifer,

    I left a voice mail and I am interested in speaking with you about the possibility of you presenting at a seminar on Backyard Chickens that the Cook County Farm Bureau is interested in hosting for its members and surrounding community in late May. We are in the planning stages but need to finalize the specifis by week end for advertising if we move forward. I look forward to speaking with you at your your earliest convenience.

    Reply

  19. Posted by mary murphy on May 28, 2012 at 8:39 pm

    Hi,
    I am concerned about our backyard hens. I’d like to arrange a consultation. They seem healthy and normal, but I’ve noticed their faces have dark areas that weren’t there before. Thank you very much. mary

    Reply

  20. Posted by Susan on June 2, 2012 at 4:29 pm

    Hi Jennifer, I hate to bother you with this but I really don’t know what to do. I have only been raising chickens for a year now. I had my regular vet (not an avian vet) do fecals on my chickens as a precaution. The came back that 2 of the 3 had Coccidia. They have no symptoms except for poop on their vent feathers. They were all vaccinated for this when they came from the hatchery a year ago. I do not have an avian vet nearby so my vet is going to investigate on the Internet to see what we should do. I was overwhelmed with the info on the Internet. Can you suggest to me what to do? Thx susan

    Reply

    • Susan –
      No worries. There are 9 strains of coccidiosis that affect chickens. Chickens often have a few strains of coccidia in their systems and develop immunity without getting sick. A problem may arise when you introduce a bird from a new flock – your birds could be affected by the strain the new bird has or vice versa.
      Have your vet see The Chicken Health Handbook by Gail Damerow, pp. 98-104. Let me know what happens.
      Jen

      Reply

  21. Dear Ms. Murtoff,

    I’m reaching out to see if you have any interest in hosting a live video conference on BigMarker.com for our “Make Your Mark” Speaker Series. I found you while researching environmental and “green” speakers online and yours seems truly unique. BigMarker is a start-up company located in Chicago looking for exciting and interesting speakers for our debut speaking series, and can offer you promotion, and a percentage of ticket sales (if you want to charge attendees) among other things.
    Let me know if this sounds like something you would be interested in or if you have any questions or comments. Thank you for your time and attention.

    Reply

  22. Posted by Brittney Blair on June 19, 2012 at 4:23 pm

    Hi Jen,
    I’m hoping to send you an email about a chicken raising project I’m looking to start at a fairly non-traditional garden setting in Chicago, which I think you might find interesting. Can you please backchannel me when you get a moment? Seems like you are doing great work and I’d love to get you involved in this project if possible.

    Thanks much,
    Brittney

    Reply

  23. Posted by Angie palma on July 6, 2012 at 2:15 pm

    Hi I have 4 hens and the Forest Park has changed their ordinancesand now we are not allowed to keep them. A complaint was filed by my neighbor since she has nothing better to do! But need to find them a new home ASAP…! Do you know of any org?anizations tha will take them? Or maybe a family? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank You!

    Reply

    • Hi, you can try posting a message to the Chicago Chicken Enthusiasts Google Group. I can also post the birds to my site if you send me pix, description, and contact information.

      Reply

  24. Posted by Margie Lentz on July 8, 2012 at 7:57 pm

    A few months ago we purchased 6 chicks from a hatchery.  One of those chicks grew to be a beautiful rooster.  Unfortunately, we are unable to keep roosters and are in desperate need of finding him a no-kill home.  We have asked many neighbors, but they cannot guarantee our pet will end up in a stew pot.  Can you help or direct us to a facility that can?  Thank you so much for your time.

    Margie Lentz

    Reply

  25. Posted by nancy on July 16, 2012 at 9:31 pm

    JUST an FYI . . on my facebook page I joined the Kankakee Swap,Buy,Sell,Farm Animals, & Farm Stuff . . . people list their chickens on there if they wish to sell and/or buy chickens . . my suggestion is list your roosters/chickens there if you want to find them a new home . . it seems to work

    Reply

  26. Would you be willing to sign my petition to the City of Joliet, calling on them to allow backyard chickens?

    I would be ever so grateful.

    http://signon.org/sign/allow-backyard-chickens.fb19?source=c.fb&r_by=658597

    Reply

  27. Posted by Kate Maver on August 30, 2012 at 6:47 pm

    I guess I missed the chicken meeting at the library the other day, but I just read in the Herald about the new petition for Arlington Heights to accept chickens. I am an Arlington Heights resident and I would be delighted to sign such a petition. I’m unlikely to have chickens myself, as I don’t own this home, and my next stop is likely to be an apartment building, but I am all for anything that provides people with the means to reduce cruelty to animals. Factory chickens suffer ‘way too much. So, please pass along my email address to the petitioners, or let me know how I can get a hold so I can sign it. thanks!

    Reply

  28. Posted by Sally Tauber on September 7, 2012 at 6:25 pm

    Jennifer Murtoff,
    Hi. I read about your recent backyard chicken presentation at the Arlington Heights Library. I had been thinking this would be fun to do in my yard in Park Ridge. I contacted City Hall and was told to contact my Alderman. I emailed Marty my Alderman and he responded by saying currently Park Ridge does not allow chickens in yards, but others have inquired about this possibility and how did I want to move forward on this subject. …
    That is where you come in. Typically do you do presentations for communities to bring awareness and gauge support for backyard chicken coops? Do you charge and if so how much. Typically who covers your fee if so?
    Do you suggest citizens get a 200 person petition as in Arlington Heights as a step before or after one of your presentations? Do you present to the public or the city council. How does this work – trying to get ones city to be chicken friendly?
    Look forward to hearing from you so I can know what to request from my Alderman.
    Sally Tauber
    Park Ridge resident, taubsall@aol.com, 847-823-3319

    Reply

    • Hi, Sally –
      Thanks so much for your interest in chickens and in my work.
      Perhaps we could discuss your questions on the phone. I’ll try to touch base with you in the next few days.
      Jen

      Reply

  29. Posted by marci on September 11, 2012 at 8:15 am

    Wondering if you or if you could tell me how to find out if Chickens are allowed in Lisle, IL?

    Reply

  30. Posted by Ruth on September 17, 2012 at 9:44 pm

    Hi, was wondering if I could purchase eggs from anybody NW city or burbs?
    Thanks!
    Ruth

    Reply

    • Hi, Ruth –
      I can send out an email.
      If you look up Ellis Family Farms, they see eggs that have the highest rating for humane treatment (Animal Welfare Approved).
      Jen

      Reply

  31. Posted by Sarah A on September 27, 2012 at 8:08 pm

    I am a student at Maine South High School writing an article for my school newspaper. I believe you helped rescue a rooster from the forest preserve across the street from our school last weekend, and I have some questions about the rooster and how it might have survived the winter if it had not been rescued. I would like to email you directly and ask these questions if this is possible. Thanks so much! Sarah A

    Reply

  32. Posted by Laura Siebert on October 2, 2012 at 4:31 pm

    Can you tell me the status of the Rooster that was found a week ago? I am being told that you placed him in a kill farm. When a home that was found that would keep it in as a house pet.

    Reply

  33. I am part of a movement in Elmhurst to get our ordinance changed to include chickens. Any help is appreciated! Our page is https://www.facebook.com/BackyardChickensForElmhurstIl?fref=ts and we are collecting signatures online and on paper…

    Reply

  34. Posted by Kim Wilson on October 23, 2012 at 1:17 pm

    Jennifer,

    One of the two chickens I have left was killed a couple of weeks ago when I was on vacation now I only have one left. I really want to get a couple more sooner than later. Is there anything I have to do before hand to get the coop and the remaining chicken ready. I read that it is a tricky thing to do. You’ve seen my set up before but if you need to come out and do a consult that will work for me too. I miss my chickens, the one that’s left seems so lonely to me but I’m sure I’m projecting.

    Reply

    • Hi, Kim –
      Sorry to hear you are down to one. )-: She probably is lonely; they are flock animals and love to be around other birds. Are you going to try to integrate adult birds? You might consider adopting from Prairie Crossing. The adoption date is 11/3. I’d be happy to come out and talk to you before or after you have the new birds. I recommend having a spare cage on hand. (I have your chicken gardens book, too!)
      Jen

      Reply

      • Posted by Kim Wilson on October 24, 2012 at 12:10 pm

        Jen, I was thinking of getting younger ones since I still would like to get eggs from them. That said I may still go out to Prairie Crossing on their adoption day, the idea of all them abandoned chickens are just so sad.

  35. Posted by Barbara on November 2, 2012 at 9:10 am

    Please if anybody can help this is tomorrow — Saturday!!
    Now that they’re not economically useful the PC Learning Farm wants to adopt out as many hens as possible before killing the rest…

    Reply

  36. Posted by Leann on November 2, 2012 at 1:58 pm

    I live in a suburb that allows for owning chickens under certain conditions. One of those conditions was that the coop must be kept 50 feet from all property lines. Very few of our lots can accommodate this condition. I started keeping chickens anyway after speaking to all the surrounding neighbors and finding that they were all agreeable to the situation. I have now had a small flock for the past 4 years. Today I have just received a letter from the village that I am in violation of village codes and must abate before Nov. 30th. I can also appeal based on specific guidelines. I am heart-broken about this and need to get some advice on what to do. Can you help?

    Reply

  37. Posted by Andrea Wolff on November 27, 2012 at 12:24 pm

    The Oak Park Conservatory has FREE bales of hay if anyone can use it. 708.386.4700

    Reply

  38. Posted by nick on January 5, 2013 at 7:40 pm

    Hello

    I just found you guys tonight and wish I could of come to the seminar today. I live in Campton Hills and really want to start raising some broilers next summer. I have HOA restrictions but I live on 1.5 acres. Really I am looking for a place to run some Joel Salatin type coops next summer and raise between 30 and 60 birds.
    I look forward to getting moved involved in this blog and community. Hope to hear back from you.
    Nick

    Reply

    • Hi, Nick –
      Sorry you couldn’t make it. You would probably be interested in the Chicago Chicken Enthusiasts Google Group as well. There may be a market there for your proposed broilers; likewise, I’ll be happy to post to my blog. Cheer,
      Jen

      Reply

  39. Posted by Michelle Anderson on January 22, 2013 at 1:47 pm

    Hi Jen,
    I live in LaGrange Park and I am curious if you know of any others in my town that may be working to get the ordinance changed so we can have chickens? I have began reaching out via Facebook etc, I was given your name. If you do know of anyone in the hood that would be great. If you do not, I am wondering if you can direct me as to what steps I need to take to prepare for the Board Meeting that will occur second week of February. Thanks, Michelle

    Reply

    • Hi, Michelle –
      You may want to try posting to the Chicago Chicken Enthusiasts Google Group. I don’t know of anyone offhand, but there may be someone on that list.
      Good luck, and let me know if you need a consultant or expert witness.
      Jen

      Reply

  40. Posted by Lisa on January 24, 2013 at 1:11 pm

    Hi Jen,

    Are you teaching a class any time in the near future? I want to get some chickens this spring and would love to attend one of your seminars.

    Thanks,
    Lisa

    Reply

  41. Posted by Linda Mysliwiec on March 1, 2013 at 4:58 pm

    Hello!
    My company is beginning their planning for Earth Week Celebrations and activites.
    Would you have any interest in speaking at our office? Please contact me at linda_mysliwiec@gensler.com if you would like to discuss more. Thanks so much!

    Reply

  42. Posted by Jessie Crow Mermel on March 7, 2013 at 5:12 pm

    Thanks for creating a post about the first ever Urban Livestock Expo! I noticed the link to Angelic Organics Learning Center was broken. Could you please make sure that it is properly linked to http://www.learngrowconnect.org ?
    Thank you!

    Reply

  43. My IsaBrown hen died Thursday night of unknown causes. She seemed fine until that evening when she fell asleep outside had to be prodded to go into the coop. She was less than a year old and stopped laying eggs when it got cold and dark in the fall. On Tuesday, we had two eggs (we had 2 hens) so I thought she was starting up again. Do you have any idea what might have caused her death? If there is anything I should do to prevent that situation in the future, I’d like to know.

    Reply

  44. Hi, Cindy –
    So sorry to hear that. It is hard to say. You are in Oak Park? If so, and you can hold the body in the refrigerator, I can come out an open her up. It could be a calcium mass in the reproductive tract, liver failure, etc.
    Jen

    Reply

    • Jen
      Thank you so much for your help diagnosing her cause of death. You are so knowledgeable about chicken care and while it is not rocket science it is clear that your experience is of great value to anyone thinking about raising chickens in their backyard.

      Reply

  45. Posted by kevin schramer on March 25, 2013 at 8:48 pm

    Hi Jen,
    My name is Kevin Schramer, and I’d like to thank you for referring me recently for a coop build in Chicago.
    I just completed the project and I think it turned out pretty good. It was a real custom job because it had to fit between a garage and a sidewalk. The homeowner said he met you at the Urban Livestock Expo in February and that you’d given him some names of potential builders.
    I really enjoyed the project and would like to do more in the future. I think I’ll probably put together a website/blog type thing that would feature more info on what I can do and pictures of past projects etc. I’ll send you a link when I get it done.
    In the meantime I was wondering if I could send you some pictures of the recent project, to get your opinion.
    Thanks again
    kevin

    Reply

  46. Posted by Johanna Vargas on April 3, 2013 at 12:21 am

    Hello, I have a beautiful rooster named Pi who is full of personality and very affectionate but my neighbor asked if we could find him a new home due to the crowing. I have seen that roosters can be difficult to “re-home” but I’d appreciate any suggestions. I’d be happy to pay for feed, care, etc., I just feel awful- like I took him from a farm where he would have been killed only to get him attached to us… I’m happy to pay for consult fees, whatever- I just want Pi to find a good home. Thank you all.

    Reply

    • Hi, Johanna –
      Good luck with rehoming your baby, and good for you for being a good neighbor.
      I have a list of folks you can contact. I will send that to you via email.
      Best,
      Jennifer

      Reply

  47. Posted by Johanna Vargas on April 4, 2013 at 1:15 pm

    Jennifer- thank you for your assistance. I will comb through those contacts and see what I can come up with. For anyone else who may ever find themselves in this situation, I want to add that I had asked both neighbors before bringing him home, but kind of left myself open to this by telling them to let me know if the crowing ever became an issue. 8 months later, here we are… And It is just part of being a good neighbor, I suppose. Poor roosters- they get a real bum deal, it seems.Anyway, thanks.

    Reply

    • Kudos to you for checking with the neighbors and for making good on your promise. Roosters are great (when they’re not crowing or flogging you!). Good luck.
      Jen

      Reply

  48. Posted by Cathy Schroeder Ward on April 5, 2013 at 11:55 am

    Hello! I am a first grade teacher and am able to get some fertilized chicken eggs for the classroom to hatch. However, I want to have homes for these chicks once hatched. Do you know how I can find backyard enthusiasts or farmers who would like a few chicks?

    Thanks so much!
    Cathy

    Reply

  49. Hi Jen, Interested in a consultation with you- wanting to keep a few chickens in my suburban backyard near SF CA. I have two main issues I can’t figure out:
    a) the yard is steep everywhere. Like 25 degree steep.
    b) we won’t always be home at night to shut the chickens in, and I need a coop design that accommodates that.
    Would deeply appreciate your input on this.
    -K.

    Reply

  50. Posted by Mary granger on May 7, 2013 at 3:15 pm

    I am trying to change the village ordinances in Villa Park to allow residents to raise chickens on their property. I was able to get the issue out on the docket of the environmental commission on march 23rd at 7:30pm. Do you have and tips or information that I can present during the meeting to help persuade the village to change the laws?

    Thank you,
    Mary

    Reply

    • Hi, Mary –
      Please see the tab on Legalizing Chickens on the main page of my blog. Also, I’ve served as an expert witness in the past. Let me know if you’d be interested in that service.
      Best,
      Jennifer

      Reply

  51. Jen —

    I have on my calendar (from a long time ago) that you will be offering a Chicken 1st Aid workshop on Saturday, June 1st — but I haven’t seen any details come out about it (where? time? cost?). It it still happening?

    Sharon

    Reply

  52. Sorry to hear that — but thanks for letting me know…

    Reply

  53. Hi again,

    Sorry to double-post, but I just wanted to add that I know that people would have already invested in pullets, so I’d be willing to compensate them for that if they’re looking to sell some. Thanks,

    Greg

    Reply

    • Hi, Greg –
      I don’t know anyone offhand who has pullets right now. I’d suggest starting in the spring.
      You may want to check with local farmers or see if there is a poultry club that might be able to help.
      Good luck,
      Jen

      Reply

  54. Posted by Tamra Thetford on July 17, 2013 at 10:53 am

    We have 4 chickens in Chicago and all are doing well. A “rougue chicken” was located in a park by us and folks contacted me thinking it might be one of mine. I’m trying to find the owner but so far no luck. I’m at capacity and don’t want to keep the chicken. Is there any issue with taking it to the live butcher if it seems healthy or any other ideas?

    Reply

    • Hi, As long as it’s healthy, you can do that.
      Lidia at Belmont Feed and Seed might take it, too – and it will probably end up in a stew pot. I’m sore the owner didn’t want an extra roo.
      Jen

      Reply

  55. Posted by Susan on July 25, 2013 at 2:10 pm

    Jennifer you are AWESOME! I just finished reading about the chickens at The Cook County Jail. What a wonderful idea! I have always wanted to do something along those lines. I have heard of people who use chickens as therapy animals also. If you need volunteers to help with the jail program I would LOVE to help out. I raise cochin hens. I have rehomed 3 of my roosters (two cochin and one mottled houdan) to wonderful homes. One of my roosters (Larry Bird) you were instrumental in helping me find him a home. He lived with Joanne Wiedermann Wolf at Hidden Marsh Farms for almost a year. When their roos beat him up I had to find him another home. He now lives with a little 9 yr old boy in Champaign who adores him. and calls him “Big Beautiful”. I love a happy ending and I love that you are using chickens in such a wonderful way and helping others at the same time.

    Reply

    • Thanks for the compliment! Thanks for the volunteering offer; the County pulled me in to advise and set things up, which seems to be the extent of my involvement. I love Cochins. I’m glad you found a home for Larry Bird!

      Reply

  56. Posted by Zoryana on August 5, 2013 at 10:16 pm

    I need help. I have had hens in the back yard for a year now. All was well. They clucked around and I didn’t worry. I enjoy their banter. However, since it got warm my chickens, not all but my EE and D’Anver turned into holy terrors from 6:30-8:00 am each morning (after that they are angels, nothing to do with laying schedule by the way). They do not do the “egg song” they just sit there in middle of coop and scream their heads off (I spied on them several times to see what was going on). I am so worried neighbors will get upset (their windows are right over the run) and I am worried what actually happened to start this behavior! Any suggestions would be welcome. They have been all laying way before this behavior started so that isn’t it either. THANKS in advance for help.

    Reply

    • Hi, Zoryana,
      I’m sorry you’re having trouble! I’m not sure what is going on there – do they want to be out of the coop? Is this a morning song (my birds – the parakeets especially) do a lot of morning vocalization. You might try letting them out earlier or feeding earlier.
      Jen

      Reply

    • Posted by Tamra Thetford on August 6, 2013 at 8:24 am

      I just wanted to chime in that our girls do that too but usually after they’ve escaped their run and had some time to wander about and then are confined. They are clearly voicing their displeasure. Seems like yours might be flustered by something else. Other causes of that super loud clucking for us have been when they need more food or water or one time a rat got into their coop.

      Reply

      • Thanks, Tamra –
        There are predator calls – they will raise a ruckus if they see a hawk or something like a rat or a dog. There are different vocalizations for each. Behavioral changes are usually meaningful and in response to a change in the environment.

      • Posted by Zoryana on August 6, 2013 at 8:55 am

        so at first I thought same, but, my chicken coop door opens automatically very early for them. they always have access to food an water, and no rats either. the only “predators” around are cra but my chickens are used to cats so They do not know those are predators ha ha. I have covered all basis, these birds have nothing to complain about 🙂

      • That’s very odd, Zoryana. If you’d like me to come out for a healthy hens visit, let me know.
        Jen

      • Posted by Zoryana on August 6, 2013 at 8:58 am

        here is a question, would chickens ever do that to “intimidate” other chickens or show dominance?

      • Dominance is usually asserted through aggression, rather than vocalization.

  57. Posted by Zoryana on August 6, 2013 at 9:54 am

    I live in Chicago, how much would a visit be? I think it would help since I am new to chickens so any suggestions would be welcomed

    Reply

    • A Healthy Hens visit is $60 for an hour, plus mileage (I waive the mileage fee if you are inside a 10 mile radius of my home office). I’d recommend a visit if you’re new to chickens!

      Reply

  58. Posted by Zoryana on August 6, 2013 at 4:47 pm

    let me know how I can set it up, I am not entirely new to chickens, but new enough to have consultation, farm practices are different then urban ones so would like advice

    Reply

  59. Posted by Paula on August 27, 2013 at 11:29 am

    Hi! From what I’ve read, chickens still aren’t allowed in River Forest. Do you have any info on who might already be working with the city to try and lift this ban? I’m assuming it would be better to work together! Thank you!

    Reply

  60. Posted by katie on September 3, 2013 at 10:58 am

    Hi, my name is Katie Kijowski, I’m a TV producer here in Chicago. We are doing a show on Urban Agriculture and I would love to have someone from Home to Roost come onto the show tomorrow from 10:45AM to 12 Noon. Please contact me at your earliest convenience as I am working on deadline. My office is 312-705-2646, my cell is 312-545-3126. Thanks, Katie

    Reply

  61. Fun blog post I recently did that I thought you may like to share with your readership:
    http://www.sweetpeachblog.com/journal/2013/10/3/ellen-deheneres-friends.html

    Reply

  62. Thanks for the class today at the Plainfield Library. Packed full of good info for beginners. Observing an egg being laid in person and being able to hold your hen was a cool unexpected bonus.

    Reply

  63. Hello! I was at the Urban Livestock Expo this past weekend to hear your talk as I’m interested in having chickens. I’m in Oak Park and it would be helpful to see other setups in the area. Could you connect me with OP clients or is there another way to find out who in my community is already doing this successfully?

    Thank you,
    Christine Diedrich

    Reply

  64. Posted by Elizabeth Plonka on March 23, 2014 at 4:55 pm

    Hi,
    I left a message earlier today about a hen wellness visit. My chicken who seems ill is now isolated and I think she could possibly be egg bound. I don’t have much experience but she definitely is much less active.
    Very concerned,
    Elizabeth

    Reply

  65. Posted by Susan on April 24, 2014 at 10:41 pm

    Jenn,
    I can not seem to find your email address. We are thinking of getting our chicks this weekend or next and are in need of help with our brooder box set up.

    Thanks,
    Susan

    Reply

  66. Posted by Jessica Roble Cinelli on May 20, 2014 at 7:47 pm

    Hi, Jennifer! We’d like to have a program at the Oak Park Public Library about keeping chickens in the backyard. Are you interested/available to share your expertise with our patrons?

    Reply

  67. Posted by Sharman on May 24, 2014 at 11:38 pm

    My husband and I have taken the plunge and gotten three chicks. We are interested in having someone take a look at what we’ve set up so far to make sure it will work out for them. Can you contact me to discuss this? Thanks
    Sharman

    Reply

  68. Posted by DJ Green on August 19, 2014 at 9:45 am

    Greetings LOVE the site and info. I have a farm/garden on the south side of chicago with chickens and a turkey. Turkey is not looking too good. Are there any poultry specialist that can come checkout the fowls or a place near the city that I can take them too? Please help and I appreciate any and every response! Thanks!

    Reply

    • Hello –
      Sorry to hear about your turkey!
      You can try some of my recommended avian vets in the area. See the Resources tab on my blog for a list of my recommendations.
      Your best bet might be Drs. Ness and Nye in Lisle.
      Jen

      Reply

  69. Posted by Julie on September 11, 2014 at 1:51 pm

    Hi there. I was referred to you by a Chicago chicken enthusiast. A beautiful chicken (hen, I believe, though I can’t be sure) wandered into our yard last night and has apparently decided to hang around. We think she’s been missing from her home for at least 48 hours, because of sitings around the neighborhood. I know nothing about chickens and am not equipped to care for one, but I was told you might know someone/place who would be willing to take her, at least temporarily. Please contact me if you think you can help!

    Reply

  70. In O.P. I have a hen that has been staying in the coop, moving slow, comb off color. Wonder if you can help. New to chickens this year.

    Reply

  71. Posted by david on December 12, 2014 at 8:22 pm

    I have heard that I can help heat my 4X4 raised coop for the winter by leaving the bedding in the bottom and using the heat from the compost to heat the coop. How does one do this so the coop does not get smelly, too wet, etc?

    Reply

    • Hi, David –
      This is called the deep litter composting method. Let the chickens turn the bedding, keeping it at about 4-6 inches. As it decomposes, add more bedding. Monitor it regularly. If it’s white, hard, and caked, then it’s not being turned enough. If you can squeeze a handful and the clump that you make doesn’t fall apart, it’s too wet and you should add pine shavings. If it’s smelly, add bedding. As with any compost, the key is keeping the correct ration of green (poop) to brown (carbon). Avoid using diatomaceous earth in the bedding – it will kill beneficial microorganisms. Best bedding for this is pine shavings. Monitor for damp bedding (best to keep waterers outside the coop if you’re doing deep litter and watch for mold and mildew if you’re using straw or hay – remove immediately if you see/smell it. Mold and mildew can be dangerous to both humans and birds, especially if inhaled. Harvey Ussery’s The Small Scale Poultry Flock has a chapter devoted to deep litter. Hope that helps!

      Reply

  72. Hi there!

    I am writing because I recently found a stray quail in my alleyway and I am looking for some advice on what to do. We have been trying to find his/her owner but have not yet had any luck, and are trying to decide what our next move should be. She is a Japanese Quail just like Penny. We also live in Chicago and do not have previous experience caring for a bird. We had been feeding her seed and millet given to us by a neighbor that has birds, and so far she is eating, drinking and going to the bathroom normally.

    I hope we can touch base – your article about Penny helped me identify our bird!

    Best,

    Sarah

    Reply

  73. Posted by Laura on April 28, 2015 at 8:38 pm

    Hi, Jennifer! This is Laura, who found the chicken in the park last week. I wanted to let you know that Corinne from Earth Sanctuary came to pick her up on Thursday. My husband grew quite attached to the chicken, but she is off to a better home than we could give her. Thank you for your help!

    Reply

  74. Posted by Deborah on April 29, 2015 at 9:32 pm

    my silkie chicken keeps hiding in the nest box. I bring her out among the others in the group to eat and drink she keeps picking at her feathers with her beak since the chickens lay during the day I close the door to the nesting area tonight why does she keep hiding and pecking herself. a week ago she was a happy chicken giving six eggs a week

    Reply

    • Hi, Deborah –
      My guess is that she is broody (wants to hatch eggs). A hen’s mannerisms and vocalizations will change when she is broody – she will puff up her feathers to make herself look larger, and may growl and peck at you when you put your hand in the nest box. Silkies are known for going broody easily.

      Reply

  75. Posted by Deborah on April 29, 2015 at 11:08 pm

    thank you she is pecking at me and my fiance when we put our hands in the nest box to check for eggs sometimes she sits on anothers eggs I’m worried because she picks at her feathers also I had to open the nest box door back up she was flying into it and would have broken her neck I had no choice my poor baby

    Reply

    • You can try putting her on a raised, wire-bottom cage (like a rabbit hutch, with 1/2-1/4 inch hardware cloth as the floor) with no bedding, no nest box, and no place to get comfortable for hatching! After 3-4 days she should be over her broodiness. Sometimes they snap out of it; other times it takes a while. If she is broody, this is normal! And silkies are generally very good mothers. Good luck!

      Reply

  76. Posted by Deborah on April 29, 2015 at 11:34 pm

    I just have to take her out of her nest box to eat and drink I don’t think she goes down to the Hen peck restaurant very often

    Reply

    • A broody will generally leave the nest once a day to poop and eat. They tend to lose weight when broody, and if they don’t snap out of it after 21 days, they can compromise their health.

      Reply

  77. Posted by Deborah on April 30, 2015 at 12:56 am

    I’m glad I’m home so I can get her to eat and drink as often as possible. She gets thirsty. How many weeks will she be sitting on invisible eggs? Do feed stores have special feed for her? 🐥🐥🐥

    Reply

    • Hi, Deborah – A hen will sit for 21 days, or until eggs hatch. There is no special feed. Are you in Chicago, and would you like me to come by? I can also do a phone consultation.

      Reply

  78. Posted by Deborah on April 30, 2015 at 9:03 am

    I live in Cali. Thank you for your help

    Reply

  79. Posted by Zoryana Byrne on May 19, 2015 at 6:46 am

    Hello, I have a question. I have an urban coop with 7 bantams. The coop is large enough so it the run. They are fed organic pellets, have clean water and occasional snacks. You came out last year to check on them just so I could make sure I am doing things right.
    I have a serious problem. My hens for se reason scream in summers betwen hours of 5:45 and about 7. They are worst then having a rooster! I have neighbors with chickens and nothing like this! Any idea or pointer on what I can do to stop this? I understand birds are noisy, but this is taking it to a whole different level. This doesn’t seem normal!

    Reply

    • Hi, Zoryana –
      I’m not sure what you mean by “screaming.” Are they frightened? If not, they might be just happily singing to greet the morning. Some breeds (and some birds) are noisier than others. You could keep them in the dark until the time you want them to wake up. Keep in mind that shortening the amount of light they get per day may reduce egg production, though.

      Reply

      • Posted by Zoryana on May 19, 2015 at 11:12 am

        No this is not their “egg song” or danger screams. It is just louder then rooster crow constant clucking for an hour an a half starting at 5:45 am. They only seem to do this when it is summer, do not do it in winter. I tried keeping them in coop longer amount of time but that does not help. They just still start this on their roost half sleep so to speak. Once 7 am hits, the noise completely stops and they are just normal noise level birds for the rest of the day.

      • Hmmm… I’m not sure, but my guess is it might have to do with sunrise.

  80. Posted by Annie Barrus on May 27, 2015 at 8:22 pm

    Hi — wondered if you could refer me to a chicken consultant like you in the San Diego / Escondido area of CA for my sister, who would like to start keeping a few hens at her new house. They would be pets more than anything, as my sister is vegetarian and looking to love some birds and keep them in healthiest, happiest conditions, but has zero experience. — Annie

    Reply

  81. Posted by Angela on June 16, 2015 at 6:17 pm

    We would like to take our four hens to someone else’s yard or farm while we are out of town for two weeks. We live in Chicago. Does anyone out there chicken sit for a fee? We normally ask our neighbors to look after them here, but with all these rains it’s too much to ask them to deal with the chickens and the potentially flooded coop/backyard.
    -Angela
    anmayaba@yahoo.com

    Reply

    • Hello –
      Thanks for your post – Have a look at the Resources tab for folks who are interested in pet sitting. I also have written 2 posts on chicken sitting, regarding what to look for. You can post this request to the Chicago Chicken Enthusiasts Google Group, too. I generally recommend keeping your flock isolated from others to avoid spreading disease.

      Reply

  82. Hi Jen,

    We’re in Oak Park and would like to get started by having an assessment consultation. Where can we email you about this?

    Best,
    John

    Reply

  83. Hi, Jen. I have 3 Cayuga ducks, actually 2 ducks and a drake, looking for a new home. 4 months old, healthy and fun, but too noisy for my neighborhood. I have pictures but don’t see how to attach them here. Free to a good home. Sbrzweig@gmail.com.

    Reply

  84. Posted by Laurie stumpf on August 14, 2015 at 4:37 pm

    Hi Jennifer,
    I have two chickens (which I love and take great care with) but have been told I need to get rid of them. I want/need to have the ordinance changed! Can you please contact me to let me know if you ever made progress with your fight to allow chickens in Orland Park. I am willing to join you in the battle to have this ordinance changed.
    Thank you!
    Laurie

    Reply

    • Hi, Laurie –
      I’d suggest 1) coming into compliance with the village ordinance by rehoming your birds, 2) getting a petition together and collecting as many signatures as you can, 3) talking to board members/trustees individually as well as the mayor about why chickens are a good idea for Orland Park to see where each person stands, what their objections are, and how to dispel them, 4) bringing a formal request for changing the ordinance to the village board at a town hall meeting. I’ll be happy to serve as a consultant in any step of the process, either as an expert witness or in helping the village draft a revised ordinance.

      Reply

  85. Posted by Di Stebbins on August 25, 2015 at 8:58 am

    Hi, I have a pet chicken, that is a backyard chicken, that has come down with the Markes virus, I think. He is not eating, toes curling, has very poor balance and loosing lots of weight. I have tried force feeding her water with electrolytes, that I give horses. Not sure what to do? Please advise. Thank U, Di

    Reply

  86. Posted by Mona on January 11, 2016 at 7:05 pm

    Hello! I’m a 3rd grade teacher at a school in Humboldt Park! We are planning to raise chickens this school year. We are in search of all the experts we can find in order to make sure we do this right! Any and all advise, help, expert-ness you can offer would be greatly appreciated. I look forward to hearing from you and hopefully partnering with you to raise chicken’s with the city’s youth! 🙂

    Reply

    • Hi, Mona –
      Thanks for your email.
      I’m happy to help in any way I can.
      Do you know what kind of help you’re looking for? A private class/training, onsite consult, coop design, offsite classes?
      I can discuss some options with you at different price points, depending on your needs and budget.
      I’ll email you and we can set up a time to talk, if that works for you.

      Reply

  87. Posted by Matt Huels on February 29, 2016 at 9:44 pm

    I’m in oak park and interested in raising chickens. Would you be able to refer me to someone who builds coops or not off the shelf product you would recommend?

    Reply

  88. Posted by bradley rio on March 24, 2016 at 8:08 am

    I was looking for any contact information for people who are currently working towards changing the ordinance in Riverside. I am a resident and would like to get involved Could you help me?

    Reply

  89. Hi Jennifer! I’m a producer for the You & Me morning show on WCIU. We’d love to do a story with you about your chicken classes. We could do something in our studio or come out live to you. Let me know if you’re interested and we can work out the details! Thanks for your time and consideration!

    Vicki Zwart

    Reply

  90. Posted by Chickenhawk on May 25, 2016 at 3:41 pm

    My next door neighbor has chickens and they are all over the neighborhood. I am not interested in chickens! We had a conversation about her wayward birds; I suggested a fence tall enough to keep her chickens in her yard. This has not happened and her chickens continue to trespass. Additionally the city rodent control suggested that her chicken feed is responsible for rats in the neighborhood. Any suggestions? I am not interested in rats or chickens is there an agency or chicken police I can call?

    Reply

    • This sounds like a tough situation. I’m sorry you are dealing with this. This is an exception: most chickens in the city are kept in such a way that neighbors on either side are fine, even happy, with their presence. This is the very kind of scenario that the larger chicken-keeping community hopes to avoid. In my classes and interactions with clients, I encourage folks to be good neighbors and responsible pet owners. It is unfortunate you are dealing with this. Many neighborhoods do have rats already, which are attracted to garbage cans, but there are a number of measures that can be taken to prevent feed spillage. You are correct in that a higher fence would prevent escapism. If you have tried to work things out with your neighbor on your own, then perhaps a call to the City is in order. Again, it is unfortunate that you are in this situation.

      Reply

  91. Posted by Sandie Johnson (from LaSalle) on May 27, 2016 at 9:12 am

    I just watched the clip on WGN, Jennifer! It was great! Congratulations! I hope it gives your business a big boost!

    Reply

  92. Posted by Emily Roben on June 5, 2016 at 8:10 pm

    Hi Jen-
    We met a few weeks ago at the Good Food Fest at UIC and I loved your sessions about chickens. I’m so happy to have a resource for urban chickens as my husband and I are about 7 months into our first experience with 5 lovely hens.

    I’m hoping you can give us some thoughts about our 14-week-old Isa Brown’s crop problem. We’ve noticed over the past 1-2 weeks that her crop seems to be hanging lower. Then yesterday it was bigger than ever before. When we felt it, it felt rock hard, like it was full of sand. (Our entire coop’s run is a sand bottom and we do see all 5 birds eating the sand from time to time). She is still active, happy, eating, drinking, pooping. However, the size and hardness of her crop worries me. The folks over at Belmont Feed and Seed recommended feeding her lots of water and attempting to get her to vomit. I hand fed her water all afternoon, which she seemed to love and drank about 3 ounces over 3 hours. Then her crop felt like a water balloon. We thought maybe the contents of the crop had loosened up so we did turn her over to try and get her to vomit but only water came out. Then she had a couple of BIG poops that looked very sandy so we figured we were going in the right direction! …But then today her crop is again huge and rock hard. Still she is active, playful, eating, running around, but I tried giving her more water and she seems disinterested. What do you think we should do? Happy to also have an offline email or a phone consult if you think that would be better for this situation.

    Thank you so much for your help.
    Emily

    Reply

    • Hi, Emily –
      She has a sand impaction. I’ve heard of cases of this before.
      I’d clear out the sand from the run right away and let it be just dirt. I don’t recommend sand for runs because of sand impaction risk.
      It’s good that you tried clearing the crop of sand on your own (however there is a risk of the bird breathing in liquid and ending up with aspiration pneumonia).
      I would make an appointment with a certified avian vet in the area (see my Resources tab for a list). Peter Sakas at Niles Animal Hospital has seen chickens with cases of sand impaction. The sand is likely the whole way through the digestive tract and she will continue eating it (and passing it, little by little, until the sand is removed from the environment.

      Try to get an appointment for early this week, the earlier the better. If she is not getting enough nutrition, she will go downhill fast, and will not show signs of illness until she is in dire straits. Until you’re able to get her in, checking her daily to make sure she is not losing weight. You can usually get an idea of weight (muscle mass) by feeling the breast muscles on either side of the breast bone.
      Hope that helps.
      Jen

      Reply

      • Posted by Emily Roben on June 10, 2016 at 8:37 am

        Jen-
        Thanks so much for your help. We took her to a vet a bit closer to where we live – an avian-certified doctor here in Chicago. She was great and did a crop wash that day. Now the bird is still working through some remaining debris in her belly but the crop seems to be shrinking. She gave us a couple of medications to keep her intestines moving so she’s having a lot of poops 🙂
        It is a lot of work to keep her separate from the other hens and feed her separately every few hours, but it seems to be working.
        We removed all of the sand from the coop and replaced it with dirt. The other hens are LOVING it! I am worried that when this one goes back into the coop she will start eating the dirt again and have the same crop problem… but I guess we will cross that bridge when we get there. I also wonder if maybe regular dirt would pass through her system better than sand, if indeed she does start eating the dirt.

        Thanks again for your help. I hope my experience can be helpful to any other reading this blog too!

      • Great – glad to hear it. Yes, soil will pass through the system much easier than sand. You should have no trouble. Thanks for the update!

  93. Posted by knitting1105 on August 10, 2016 at 9:58 am

    I met you at the Sugar Beet garden walk. This is the link to the farm in Chatsworth that has the amazing chickens. Mark grew up in SW Oak Park. http://www.timberfeast.com

    Reply

  94. Posted by Emily Roben on October 4, 2016 at 6:02 pm

    Hi Jen-
    Quick question regarding getting new hens for our flock…
    We currently have four beautiful hens, one age 2, three age 8 months. They get along great. A friend recently asked if we would like to add two more- she has two hens that she cannot keep any more because she is moving to a smaller home and won’t have space for the hens.
    Is it ok to add hens to my flock that previously lived at someone else’s house? At first it seemed like no problem at all, but I went on the coop tour a few weeks ago and many hosts were quite diligent about washing shoes or wearing shoe covers in order to prevent spread of infection. This makes me worry that accepting two new hens to my flock might also bring infections with them!
    What do you think?
    Thanks!
    Emily
    p.s. You helped me back in June when our darling Isa Brown had a sand impaction. She is doing great now!

    Reply

    • Hi, Emily –
      I’m glad to hear your ISA is doing well!
      Introducing new birds always carries an element of risk, both in terms of disease and flock persecution. If your friend’s birds have been looking and acting healthy, then you stand a good chance of things being ok. There is always a chance of them being carriers of a disease (recall how settlers brought small pox and other diseases that did not affect them but decimated the native population). Birds can harbor viruses that cause Marek’s disease, respiratory infections, etc., and not actually be sick. Or they could have developed an immunity.
      If your friend’s birds came from a reputable source and she has had no mysterious deaths in her flock, I’d say give it a go. If her birds were rescued from one of the live poultry stores or from a swap meet, I’d be a bit more cautious.
      Check out my post “Hello, my name is… Avian Introductions” for tips on introducing new birds to an existing flock.
      If you decide not to take them, let me know; I have someone who’s actively looking for some laying hens.

      Reply

      • Posted by Emily Roben on October 14, 2016 at 8:46 pm

        Thanks so much for your reply. We decided not to take them as we are planning to get some new chicks in the spring and want to have room in the coop for more birds at that time.
        My friend ended up finding someone else to take the two hens, although I told her that if the plan falls through you might be interested, so I’ll let you know if the plan changes!
        Thanks again for your help.

      • Sure thing. If the hens end up without a home, let me know.

  95. Posted by Liz Cardwell on October 13, 2016 at 8:51 pm

    Hi Jen! We have some flight happy pullets and were wondering if you either a. recommend clipping their wings ourselves, or b. if you do house calls and could help us. We’re in Oak Park. Let me know your thoughts. Thank you!

    Reply

    • Hello, Liz –
      I do make housecalls and would be willing to help. I generally recommend leaving wings unclipped. It can throw them off balance if not properly done and is a way to escape predators. I have done it, however, in cases where the chickens were not staying in their designated area. If you’d like me to come out, I’d be happy to do so. I’ll send you an email offline as well.
      Jen

      Reply

  96. My family and I just bought a home in the NW suburbs and it comes with a chicken coop with 2 hens. I am looking for some input as I have never had chickens before. Does anyone have a checklist of daily, weekly, monthly, yearly tasks? or have advice going into the winter season? We move in about 3 weeks. Thanks for your time.

    Smith Family

    Reply

    • Hello –
      Congrats on getting chickens! Thanks for contacting me; I see you’ve also posted on the Chicago Chicken Enthusiasts’ Google Group. I will follow up with an email. If you still have an questions, let me know and I can do phone consult or in-home consult.
      Best,
      Jen

      Reply

  97. Posted by My Connected Coop on December 15, 2016 at 8:44 am

    Hi!

    My Connected Coop would love to speak with you and interview for our facebook page and website. If you are interested, please contact me at alyssa@joltedthoughts.com

    Reply

  98. Posted by Carole Arco on February 2, 2017 at 4:38 pm

    Hi! Are you offering any classes in 2017?

    Reply

    • Yes! There are two coming up on Feb 18 at the Morton Arboretum. There are also two at the Chicago Botanic Garden on May 6. I will publish them soon and also note places where I’ll be appearing as a presenter.

      Reply

  99. Posted by Tersha on February 3, 2017 at 6:28 pm

    Hi Jennifer! I’ve attended a couple of your workshops & you so graciously gave an amazing talk to my Girl Scout Troop a few years back at Ebinger School. I am reaching out to you because our School is having a 90th Anniversary Gala On April 22nd and I wanted to see if you’d be interested in donating. Perhaps a free class or group talk? We have a couple parents who keep chickens and would love to educate others. Thank you for all you do!

    Reply

  100. Posted by Michael Johnson on April 7, 2017 at 8:58 am

    Jennifer:

    My wife, Bonnie, and I took your classes at the Morton Aboretum. During our conversation you had mentioned I should contact you about a person that was very happy with the layered approach that he took for the ground under his run. You had mentioned that you would put me in contact with him. We are getting ready to take a vacation and when we return start the building of our coop and run.

    Would you please share my contact information with him so we can decide if it would be the right solution for our girls when they arrive?

    Thank you,

    Michael Johnson
    m.w.johnson2010@gmail.com

    Reply

  101. Jennifer,

    I attended one of your workshops, gave me much good information. We are down to one hen and purchased (minimum of 6) chicks to find a replacement. They are now 3 weeks old and wanted to get the word out that we have some young chicks that will need good homes. We have a Plymoth Rock and a Road Island red and the other we are not sure about the other an ICA brown or something. Just thought you might know of some people who are looking. Free for a good home.

    Thanks,

    —John Putnam

    Reply

  102. Posted by David on April 24, 2017 at 1:24 pm

    Hi John,
    If you do not find a home I would consider taking them. I would prefer only 2 of them.

    Reply

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